Los Angeles Trade Technical College’s Mariposa Learning Resource Center

Wins Award from Metal Construction Association

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS -- October 14, 2015 – The Metal Construction Association (MCA) awarded the Los Angeles Trade Technical College’s Mariposa Learning Resource Center its 2015 Chairman’s Award in the Education category for colleges and universities.

Los Angeles Trade Technical College transformed an outdated library into mixed-use campus center increasing the usable area from 78,000 square feet to nearly 100,000 square feet, providing space for a variety of student activities.

For a construction cost of $27M, the existing structure skeleton was reused, upgraded, and skinned in a new high performance envelope. Multiple functions were organized around a new central atrium and the basement was transformed into a light-filled, integrated space with views to a new carved out and landscaped garden.

Large window openings to the north provide daylight to open space areas. To the south, exterior metal sunshades combined with interior light shelves reflect natural light deep into the space without creating glare. Skylight openings on the top floor and light tubes for the lower floors transport light into the deeper floor zones.

Metal was the key component of the design. Conceptually, the exterior skin is comprised of a series of metal ribbons that weave around the building. They are pushed out by program requirements, or swung out to create shaded areas around the building, where required. The visual impact is an atmosphere of radiating energy that spreads throughout the campus.  Large window openings to the north provide daylight to open space areas.

MCA member company RHEINZINK provided the prePATINA blue-grey Interlocking Reveal Panels that make up the building exterior.

“There is a dynamic nature of it. The metal screens undulate in and out. In some areas it’s only two feet away from the wall and then in other areas it goes out five feet. When the sun hits it you get all these different shadow lines which are really, really cool,” said architect Ted Haug, AIA, LEED AP, one of the other MCA judges.

The award was announced at METALCON, the metal construction industry’s annual tradeshow and conference held at the Tampa Convention Center in Tampa, Florida October 14-16. The Chairman’s Awards are given to the year’s most exceptional building projects involving MCA member companies based on overall appearance, significance of metal in the project, innovative use of metal, and the role of metal in achieving project objectives.

Recipients for these awards are selected each year from projects submitted by MCA members to Metal Architecture Magazine’s annual Design Awards Program. The honorees were chosen by a panel of professional architects, which included Elaine Fitzgerald, AIA, CCS, ArchiTech Consulting, Inc., Mount Prospect, IL; Michael G. Fitzgerald, AIA, Principal, OKW Architects, Chicago, IL; and Ted Haug, AIA, LEED AP, Legat Architects, Chicago, IL. 

The MCA Chairman’s Awards were given in eight categories: commercial/industrial; education, colleges and universities; education, primary and secondary schools; institutional; metal roofing; municipal; and residential. The judges also recognized a project with an award for overall excellence.

METALCON is the only event dedicated to metal construction products, technologies, and solutions.

Project Recognition

MCA Member Distributor: RHEINZINK America, Inc.
Architect: Harley Ellis Devereaux
Contractor: Suffolk Construction Company, Inc.
Metal Installer: Tinco Sheet Metal
Metal Fabricator: MetalTech-USA

About the Metal Construction Association

The Metal Construction Association brings together a diverse industry for the purpose of expanding the use of metal in construction through marketing, research, technology, and education. Companies involved in MCA gain tremendous benefit from association activities that focus on research, codes and standards, market development, and technical programs. MCA’s market development efforts increase the use of metal materials in construction through the education of the building and design communities regarding the benefits of metal.

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